Tech Talk – Nationwide Series

2012-NNS-500x300The Nationwide Series has its own unique beauty within NASCAR‘s top-three series

This is the second Tech Talk installment featuring NASCAR’s top-three series and their own unique qualities. The focus here is on the Nationwide Series. Continue reading

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Tech Talk – NASCAR Camping World Truck Series

CWTSlogoaBy Rich Foust

The Camping World Truck Series is the youngest of NASCAR‘s top three divisions, but is the closest to the truest form of racing by keeping fans engaged from start to finish.

As promised in my last post, The Unique Beauty of NASCAR, this is the first of a three-part series that I will take a closer look at the similarities and differences in NASCAR’s top-three divisions – Camping World Trucks, Nationwide and Sprint Cup Series‘ – and how they are at the same time, special in there own right, with their own unique attraction for fans.

Beginning with the Camping World Truck Series, there are four areas, I’ll use to highlight the similarities and differences between all three series’  – unique attraction for fans, technology of the race vehicles, equipment, and rules structure of the teams. Continue reading

The Unique Beauty of NASCAR

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Notes-Quotes333x250By Rich Foust

There are many forms of racing all over the globe, each having a unique personality making them special. NASCAR has a unique beauty that cultivates drivers as well as fans. 

The beauty of NASCAR are their many divisions offering a ‘stairway’ to their top series, but also creating an environment for fan involvement at each level. Fans can watch a young driver come from local tracks in the Whelen, ASA, East and West coast series’ and advance to the elite Camping World Trucks, Nationwide and eventually the Sprint Cup Series’.

There is no other racing series that has so much diversity within its ranks, allowing talented drivers to start on 3/8 – and 1/4-mile local tracks in a small towns across the nation, and with luck and hard work, end up racing in NASCAR’s top division with the best drivers in the world.

While the basics are similar in NASCAR’s top-three divisions – technology of the race vehicles, rules structure of the teams and equipment – the Camping World Trucks, Nationwide and Sprint Cup Series’ are as much dis-similar as they are similar.

As fans contemplate the start of the 2013 season, I will take a closer look at the differences in NASCAR’s top-three divisions and how they are special in there own right, with their own unique attraction for fans.

Kansas Motor Speedway Tidbits

Kansas Motor Speedway broke ground in May of 1999 and is a 1.5 mile tri-oval.

This midwest track, located 15 miles west of Kansas City, Kansas, between I-435 and I-70, has 17-20 degrees of variable banking in the turns. The front stretch has 9-11 degrees of variable banking and the back stretch has 5 degrees. It seats over 72,000. Continue reading

NASCAR’s Restrictor Plate – Friend or Foe

Photo – Toyota Racing

By Rich Foust

No, it’s not the plate that you get at the salad bar…

It all started with Talladega in 1987, when Bobby Allison lost control of his car and went airborne into the catch fence, with his car traveling at a speed in excess of 200 mph. Terrified by the dangerous situation for fans and drivers, NASCAR decided something needed to be done to slow speeds to keep cars out of the grandstands and keep fans safe. Continue reading

Charlotte Motor Speedway – Round Five


By Rich Foust

Charlotte Motor Speedway is actually located in Concord, North Carolina, just outside Charlotte and opened in 1960, hosting its first World 600, now known as the Coca Cola 600. Unfortunately, about one year later, the track fell into chapter 11 bankruptcy, due to poor ticket sales.

Today, Charlotte Motor Speedway hosts three Sprint Cup Series, two Nationwide and one Camping World Truck Series events, among other racing action each year. Continue reading